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[LIVE EVENT] Sleep Hacking 101 – April 22

Do you have trouble falling asleep at night?
Do you feel tired in the mornings even after a full night’s sleep?
Do you find yourself hitting a “wall” every afternoon after lunch?

The solution: Hack your sleep for the best nights rest of your life!

Using the latest information and technology,  we will explore the steps you can take to radically improve your sleep and sleep habits.

Wednesday, April 22, 2015 @ 6:15pm – 7:30pm
Intouch Chiropractic – 580-555 West 12th Ave, Vancouver BC
LIMITED SEATING!

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Research has shown that a quarter of all Canadians are chronically sleep deprived. Unfortunately, unlike nutrition and fitness, once your missed sleep it is very difficult to make up for it later.

Sleep deprivation has also been shown to be just as deadly as smoking and can literally take years off of your life! Here’s why:

• A person who has not slept for 20 hours has a level of impairment equal to someone with a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 per cent, over the limit of 0.05, at which a driver is considered legally impaired in Ontario.

• A non-typical sleep schedule from shift work disturbs the body’s natural pattern of rest and rejuvenation, which can lead to physical and mental problems, including cardiovascular disease, hypertension, asthma, diabetes and depression.

• Chronic sleep deprivation can contribute to obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke and other medical conditions. The amount of sleep and the quality of sleep have been shown to affect appetite, weight control and the effectiveness of diets for weight loss.

• An extra hour of sleep a night appears to decrease the risk of coronary heart calcification, or hardening of the arteries, an early indicator of cardiovascular disease.

How To Get 8 Hours Of Sleep Without Drugs

sleepGetting 8 hours of restful sleep can be quite difficult for some people.

Early on in my career, I remember meeting a patient who came to my clinic with a variety of health concerns: digestive troubles, migraines, pain and other inflammatory symptoms.

Having recently moved to Winnipeg for work, she could not figure out what had gone wrong since, according to her, she was doing everything right when it came to her health.

Her nutritional profile looked good – a strict, no refined sugar, no refined carbohydrates, no toxin diet. She exercised daily (sometimes twice a day) and would proudly state how important it was for her to take care of her body with regular chiropractic care.

Stumped, I was preparing myself for a “tough case.” As we began our case history, the topic of sleep came up. Me: “How many hours of sleep do you get a night?” Her: “Sleep? Who has time for that?”

Sleep deprivation is a common problem and most people do not achieve eight hours of quality sleep each night. Without proper sleep, all systems of the body are thrown out of balance: The immune system is depressed, hormones are disrupted, digestion is compromised and the effects of sleep deprivation can mimic many elements of the aging process itself.

In her book: “Lights Out! Sleep, Sugar and Survival”, T.S. Wiley points out that sleep deprivation is also on the CDCs list of known carcinogens. Sleep deprivation has also been known to contribute to weight gain, depression and anxiety.

The primary purpose of sleep is repair and recovery. Unfortunately my high stress, very active patient was driving her body hard during the day with very little recovery at night. This is a recipe for disaster.

Contrary to popular belief, the brain is extremely active at night. The Central Nervous System actually speeds up at night to facilitate healing and repair. The brain will cycle through three phases of sleep (REM, light and deep sleep). It’s during deep sleep that the body will restore itself.

As a result, the quality of sleep is equally important as the amount. Here are three tips for achieving a deep, restful sleep:

  1. Sleep in a cave – A dark, quiet, cool room is essential for a good night’s sleep. Make sure all light is blacked out (including TVs and alarm clocks) and its not too hot in the bedroom.

  1. Minimum 8 hours – Get at least 8 hours of sleep, 9 would be better. Early riser? Try going to bed sooner.

  1. Stimulants – Alcohol, caffeine computer screens and TVs are all stimulants and should not be used at least 2 hours before bed.

Finally, after 3 weeks, my patient who claimed to be “too busy to sleep” was symptom free and on her way back to optimal health. After an honest reassessment of her time, she realized that her 3 hours of late-night TV watching before bed was stealing her sleep time.

While there are many factors involved in getting a good night’s sleep, often it is the simple changes that have the greatest benefit.

Want to Live to 100? Follow these simple steps.

UnknownWhenever I would suggest that my patients develop a plan to live to 100 and beyond, it would usually elicit groans, complaints and sometime panic. After all, who wants to live to be 100 years old, sick, on tons of medications, and unable to live life to its fullest?

Fortunately, there is good news for those pessimists out there: New research is showing that living to 100 may be easier than you think.

Currently, we have a generation of baby boomers that have watched many of their parents’ retirement years be stolen away by chronic disease and physical injury. Their impression of growing old is one of suffering and disability.

For the most part, this has been true. Over 80% of the population will die of either heart disease or cancer. The average Canadian currently fills 14 prescriptions every year, while the average senior will fill even more than that. If you look around, you’ll see Canadians are living longer, but they are not healthier.

The secret to longevity involves a complex dance between lifestyle, environment, social structure and genetics. While many of the recent studies on centenarians -people that live to 100 and beyond – have focused on genetic factors, they have also revealed certain common traits among the longest lived people in the world.

One interesting fact is that they tend not to get sick as often and when they do they tend to recover very quickly. Also, they do not seem to suffer from the same lifestyle-related illnesses that plague modern society such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes and dementia.

There are several common lifestyle factors among these centenarians. For the most part the did not smoke, they drank moderately, their diets were high in vegetable content, they had positive social influences, low stress and they were still active later on in life.

Researchers have also identified certain gene mutations that can predict longevity with some accuracy; however, it remains unclear whether these genetic mutations were hardwired at birth or epigenetic changes that occur as a result of those very same healthy lifestyle practices.

Here’s what the centenarians did to build incredible health and longevity:

Have a plan – Most centenarians had a daily routine for their diet, exercise and social activities. Surprisingly, they also regularly set goals for the future.

Eat real food – Centenarians rarely ate processed foods and consumed copious amounts of green, leafy vegetables, colorful fruits, good fats and lean healthy meats, especially oily fish.

Move – Any kind of exercise was better than none. Daily walking or other low impact activities combined with some resistance training (lifting weights) seemed to have the biggest impact on longevity.

Play – Staying mentally active whether through reading, learning new activities, puzzles, or even working beyond retirement, were also predictors of longevity.

Sleep – People that sleep 8 hours or more a night live longer and are less likely to develop heart disease and other illnesses.

The bottom line is, lifestyle plays a dominant role in living to 100 and beyond.

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